People. Policy. Place. Seminars by Dr Cass Hunter & Dr Leah Talbot


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Presenter:  Dr Cass Hunter & Dr Leah Talbot Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO)

Date: Aug 07, 2018

Time: 10:00am to 11:30am

Contact person:  Northern Institute
T: 08 8946 6854
E: thenortherninstitute@cdu.edu.au

Location:  Northern Institute, Yellow Building 1, Level 2, Room 48 (Savanna Room)

Seminar 1: The right information, to the right people, in the right format

Dr Cass Hunte, Indigenous Social-Ecological Researcher, Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO)

Abstract
Science communication has a long history of relaying technical information to audiences not trained to interpret academic material. Our brains are hardwired to remember visual or sensory information much better than abstract concepts. Creating the right environment for understanding and using science information means key elements must come together before research is actually translated into benefits. Translation of research is about getting the right information, to the right people, and in the right format. Good science communication does not often happen by chance but is based on strategic and selective design. By understanding the need for selective co-designing it means information can be further packaged according to the target audience and communication preference. Defining what is “right” for particular target groups begins with asking them. In this presentation, we focus on research in the Torres Strait that plans to use community and stakeholder input to improve the use and interpretation of environmental data. By working with communities and stakeholders we aim to understand how to go about developing an improved information system as tailored to the priorities and preferences of key target groups. 

About Dr Cass Hunter
Dr Cass Hunter is a Kuku Yalanji and Torres Strait Islander woman. Her research interests are interdisciplinary and broadly focused on the development of participatory tools to support sustainable livelihoods and ecosystems. She is an Indigenous social ecological research scientist with CSIRO Oceans and Atmosphere. Her current research focuses on improving Torres Strait Islander access to, and interpretation of the vast amount of environmental information collected in the region. The central focus of the research is to increase learning about how science outputs can be collated, designed, communicated, stored and retrived in ways that are useful to communities. She is interested in making research more inclusive, accessible, and relevant for our communities. FULL BIO

Seminar 2: Indigenous knowledge and governance in Protected Areas in Australia and Sweden and CSIRO’s Indigenous Futures Initiative

Dr Leah Talbot, Indigenous Social-Ecological Researcher, Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO)

Abstract
Protected areas across the world are key to biodiversity survival and long term sustainability of the world’s natural and cultural resources. These areas are also home to Indigenous Peoples whose traditional lands often resides within or partly within protected area boundaries. I draw on the findings of two international case-studies, Wet Tropics World Heritage Area and Laponia World Heritage Area. Findings reveal that Indigenous Peoples sovereignty of governance and the nation-state sovereignty, along with shared governance arrangements, are critical to supporting Indigenous knowledge effectively being applied in protected areas. I also show how developing an ‘Empowering Indigenous Lens’ as the research methodology enables Indigenous worldviews, epistemologies, and ontologies to underpin and support such findings to be revealed. In addition, Leah will share with you a little about CSIRO’s Indigenous Futures initiative.

About Dr Leah Talbot
Dr Leah Talbot recently completed her PhD, in the integration of conservation and Indigenous knowledge, governance systems, rights and interests. In doing this, she undertook a comparative study between the Wet Tropics World Heritage Area in Australia and the Laponia World Area in Sweden. Leah has experience in conservation and environmental management, high level Indigenous negotiations and developing collaborative Indigenous research methodologies, participative planning with Indigenous communities. She also has experience in International forums particularly in environment policy, community engagement and Indigenous involvement. Generally, her interests have always included social justice issues, Indigenous peoples rights and responsibilities, environmental issues, protection of cultural and natural resources, and finding ways and methods to develop a better future for our planet and people. Leah is also a Board Director with the Wet Tropics World Heritage Area; a member of the Indigenous Advisory Committee to the Minister for Department of Environment and Energy, a member of the Queensland Climate Advisory Council and a member of the Indigenous Reference Committee to the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority. Leah is a descendant of the Kuku Yalanji People, from the Bloomfield River area in Far North Queensland. FULL BIO

When           Tuesday, 07 August 2018 @ 10.00am – 11.30am
Where          Northern Institute, Yellow Building 1, Level 2, Room 48 (Savanna Room - MAP)
RSVP             by Monday, 06 August 2018 via Outlook or thenortherninstitute@cdu.edu.au

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