Confirmation of Candidature PhD by Research


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Presenter:  Michael Hartwig

Date: Oct 10, 2018

Time: 10:00am to 11:00am

Contact person:  Office of Research and Innovation
T: 08 8946 7289
E: eve-marie.cranmer@cdu.edu.au

Location:  Yellow 1.2.48 (Savanna Room) Casuarina Campus, Charles Darwin University

Are you listening? A case study of the factors influencing the Indigenous vote in Northern Territory elections 2005 to 2016

Abstract
The electorates in the Northern Territory are usually divided into three groups – the Greater Darwin electorates, including Palmerston and other dormitory suburbs, the urban regional, consisting of the electorates covering Katherine and Alice Springs, and the remote electorates, covering the rest of the Territory. The remote electorates have a large percentage of Indigenous voters – ranging from 43% to 90% in 2016, In the eight elections to 2008, following the expansion of the Legislative Assembly in 1983, the seven remote electorates have tended to be strong supporters of the Australian Labor Party (ALP). In four of the eight elections five ALP candidates were successful and in the other four elections, all seven ALP candidates succeeded.
In the Territory election of 2012, after it had won the reins of government in three successive polls, the ALP lost office to the Country Liberal Party (CLP) when five of the seven remote electorates changed allegiance. None of the eighteen seats in the rest of the Territory moved to another party. After four years in office, the CLP lost power in 2016, losing all but two of the eighteen seats it held after the 2012 election. Five of the seven remote seats changed party, although not all five returned to the ALP.
The aim of this project is to identify the factors influencing Indigenous voting patterns in these key election outcomes by identifying the answers to three questions:
1. How did voting behaviour change in the remote electorates of the Northern Territory in the elections 2008-2016?
2. What were the major factors driving those changes?
3. Which, if any, of these factors were uniquely Indigenous?

Biography
Michael is a retired accountant who has devoted most of his retirement to date studying various aspects of Indigenous life and culture in the Northern Territory. In 2015, he completed a degree in Indigenous Knowledge and followed this with Honours in 2017.
Michael is a widower with 2 adult children and five grandchildren, three of whom live in Germany. He combines his enthusiasm for travel and music by carting his tuba to jazz festivals and schützenfests both nationally and internationally.
Michael’s thesis for the Honours degree researched the efficacy of mutual respect in successful inter-cultural interaction. The approach to this research and thesis has been coloured by a belief that only with mutual understanding and respect between cultures can fair and successful reconciliation be achieved, a belief that forms the underlying motivation for undertaking this research. The research is under the guidance of three amazing supervisors, Dr Perry Morrison, Dr Rolf Gerritsen and Dr Kate Golebiowska.

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