CDU events

October

Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun
25
26
27
28
29
30
1
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
 
CDU Innov8 - showcasing CDU innovative research

CDU Innov8 - showcasing CDU innovative research


Add to calendar

Presenter:  Institute of Advanced Studies

Date: Oct 10, 2017

Time: 5:00pm to 7:30pm

Contact person:  Katrina Britnell
T: 08 8946 7468
E: IAScomms@cdu.edu.au

Location:  Theatre (Orange 3) CDU Casuarina Campus

Target audience:  All Welcome: Local business community Owners and operators Industry leaders Local and state government entities NGO’s Community groups Researchers Staff and students Members of the public

Charles Darwin University - Innov8

as part of October Business Month

A showcase of CDU’s research innovation
Master of Ceremonies: Richard Margetson from ABC Radio Darwin

Eight innovators will speak for eight minutes about their new research projects, giving the audience a quick insight into some of the innovative ideas CDU researchers are exploring.

Tuesday 10 October 2017, 5.30pm to 8.30pm

Please arrive at 5 pm for a 5.30pm start

Charles Darwin University Theatre (Orange 3)

Ellengowan Drive 
Casuarina, NT 0810

Drinks and light refreshments provided. Please register at innov8.cdu.edu.au

Image icon innov8_flyer_2.jpg
 
 
 
Book Launch: Gilruth by Ted Egan

Book Launch: Gilruth by Ted Egan


Add to calendar

Presenter:  Ted Egan AO

Date: Oct 12, 2017

Time: 5:30pm to 6:30pm

Contact person:  Kathryn Bailey
T: 08 8959 5235
E: kathryn.bailey@cdu.edu.au

Location:  CDU Alice Springs Campus Library, Grevillea Drive, Alice Springs

Target audience:  This event is open to the public. RSVP is required.

CDU's Alice Springs Campus Library invites you to the launch of 'Gilruth: a complex man' by Ted Egan AO.

Everybody is most welcome and signed copies of the book will be on sale during the event.

Please RSVP to kathryn.bailey@cdu.edu.au

PDF icon Book Launch: Gilruth by Ted Egan Flyer
 
 
 
 
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
 
University community forum: Respect. Now. Always.

University community forum: Respect. Now. Always.


Add to calendar

Presenter:  Charles Darwin University

Date: Oct 16, 2017

Time: 12:30pm to 1:30pm

Contact person:  Megan Nevett
T: 03 9918 4612
E: megan.nevett@cdu.edu.au

Location:  Mal Nairn Auditorium, Charles Darwin University Casuarina

Target audience:  This event is open to all. No RSVP required.

Please join us for the Respect. Now. Always. University community forum.

The forum will run from 12.30pm to 1.30pm on Monday 16 October 2017 and will be held in the Mal Nairn Auditorium, Casuarina campus.

The forum will also be videoed into other CDU campuses.

If you cannot attend in person, you can Jabber in on 1918 and you will need to connect by 12.20pm.

Have thoughts or questions for the RNA Committee? Submit them before the event to megan.nevett@cdu.edu.au.

 
 
 
National Ride2Work Day

National Ride2Work Day


Add to calendar

Presenter:  Charles Darwin University

Date: Oct 18, 2017

Time: 8:00am to 4:00pm

Contact person:  Rhonda Hedger
T: 08 8946 6592
E: rhonda.hedger@cdu.edu.au

Location:  Charles Darwin University, Casuarina campus

Target audience:  This event is open to all staff and students. No RSVP is required.

Ride2Work for health, happiness and sustainability

Get peddling with your fellow CDU staff and students on Wednesday 18 October for National Ride2Work Day; Australia’s largest celebration of bicycle commuting, and a day to join with other community members in doing something positive for yourself and our environment.

Whether you’re a regular Cadel Evans or have never ridden to work before… give it a go!

Then celebrate your efforts and get to know your cycling colleagues with a healthy breakfast in the Casuarina campus breezeway from 7.30am and 8.30am. Breakfast is free for all staff and students who ride or walk in to Casuarina campus on Ride2Work Day, 18 October.

Plus – if your trusty treadly hasn’t had a trundle for a while and you’d like to brush up on your cycling safety, please attend the free bike safety session the day before; Tuesday 17 October from 12pm to 12.45pm in Blue 1 Theatre.You’ll learn about basic bike maintenance, safety and road rules.

See you there!

 
An Evaluation of English Language Teaching Programs in Indonesian Junior High Schools in the Yogyakarta Province

An Evaluation of English Language Teaching Programs in Indonesian Junior High Schools in the Yogyakarta Province


Add to calendar

Presenter:  Dr. Yuyun Yulia, Vice Rector, Cooperation and Public Relation Affairs, English Language Department, University of Sarjanawiyata Tamansiswa (UST)

Date: Oct 18, 2017

Time: 10:30am to 11:30am

Contact person:  Northern Institute
T: 08 8946 7468
E: thenortherninstitute@cdu.edu.au

Location:  Northern Institute, Yellow Building 1, Level 2, Room 48 (Savanna Room)

Target audience:  Open to the Public - All Welcome – Please Share

Abstract
Since the enactment of Law No. 22/1999, the Indonesian Government has been restructuring its governance system from a centralized to a decentralized system and serious efforts have been done to strengthen the quality of English teaching in Indonesia, through the enactment of the 2006 School-based Curriculum (Kurikulum Tingkat Satuan Pendidikan) within the framework of communicative competence. The government required all schools in Indonesia to begin implementing this curriculum in 2010. Since the implementation of the 2006 curriculum, there has been no evaluation regarding its implementation (Liputan6.com). This evaluation study focused on case studies of 12 selected schools of the 504 junior high schools in the province of Yogyakarta. The selection was done through systematic sampling – a modified form of a simple random sampling in a systematic way (Kemper et al., 2003; Cohen, et al., 2007; Gay et al., 2009). Documentation, survey schedules, interviews, focus group discussions and class observation were used to gather the data. The data obtained through this research strategy were analyzed through SPSS statistical analysis, content analysis and data triangulation. The results show that decentralization in education created challenges such as the lack of capacity at local level to assume responsibilities from the central government and the ‘culture’ of conditioning individuals to follow orders from the top, implementing rather than initiating or designing policy. The disjuncture between the district level and the individual schools is resulting in role confusion among district staff and individual schools. The head of the District Education Office seemed only to rubberstamp the guiding school documents (curriculum, syllabus, and lesson plans) without any serious appraisal. The assessment and supervision of teachers rarely occurred and in-service training for teachers was lacking and, in any case, seemed not to impact on teachers’ performance in the classroom due to lack of monitoring and supervision from either principal or district supervisor.

About Dr. Yuyun Yulia
Yuyun Yulia is a staff member of the English Language Department of University of Sarjanawiyata Tamansiswa (UST) in Yogyakarta. Her research interests are English language teaching in EFL contexts, curriculum, discourse studies, evaluation research and English for Children. She obtained her Doctorate degree from RMIT University in Australia in 2014. She had been working as an assessor of Indonesian Junior high schools in East Java and a mentor of teacher certification program in Yogyakarta.   

RSVP by Tuesday 17 October 2017 via Outlook or thenortherninstitute@cdu.edu.au

READ MORE ABOUT OUR People. Policy. Place SEMINARS OR SHARE THIS EVENT ON FACEBOOK

 
Colonialism and Race Relations in Remote Inland Australia: Observations from the field of Australian Indigenous Studies

Colonialism and Race Relations in Remote Inland Australia: Observations from the field of Australian Indigenous Studies


Add to calendar

Presenter:  Professor Barry Judd, Professor in Indigenous Social Research, Central Australian Research Group, Northern Institute, Charles Darwin University

Date: Oct 19, 2017

Time: 2:30pm to 3:30pm

Contact person:  Northern Institute
T: 08 8946 7468
E: thenortherninstitute@cdu.edu.au

Location:  Lecture Theatre 15.1.01, CDU Alice Springs Campus

Target audience:  Open To the Public - All Welcome – Please Share

Abstract: Despite the emergence of decolonizing methods for the conduct of research involving Indigenous peoples since the 1990s, the field of Australian Indigenous Studies remains characterized by the ‘spatial distance’ that exists between professional academic researchers and the Aboriginal peoples and Torres Strait Islanders over whom they claim knowledge, understanding and ‘expertise’. This seminar is primarily observational and outlines what transpired when I decided to seek a deeper engagement with the Aboriginal community that is the focus of Judd’s research activity. Moving from south eastern Australia to the regional centre of Alice Springs in the Northern Territory this seminar discusses Judd’s efforts to close the spatial distance between researchers and researched through a series of vignettes. As the material outlined in this discussion will suggest; efforts to address the spatial distance proved only partially effective. Yet what emerged from this attempt has been an ongoing engagement with inland remote Australia and a greatly enhanced understanding the complex race relations between the Anangu (Aboriginal) peoples of the region and the non-Aboriginal population as well as the legacy of colonialism and the lingering impact the past continues to exert on the present. 

About Professor Barry Judd: Professor Barry Judd is a descendent of the Pitjantjatjara people of north-west South Australia, British immigrants and Afghan cameleers. He is a leading Australian scholar on the subject of Aboriginal participation in Australian sports. Barry's main research interest is in issues about identity – what kind of Australian identities have been formed out of the colonial contact between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal peoples in Australia. His research focuses on Aboriginal people in sport as a way of engaging the broader population in difficult questions around the place of indigenous people in Australian society. Barry is a member of the National Indigenous Research and Knowledges Network (NIRAKN). He is interested in the social impact of Australian Football on Indigenous Australia; explorations of Australian identity and the process of cultural interchange between Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples; constructions of Australian citizenship and Australian nationalism; Aboriginal affairs policy and administration. Read his full profile HERE.

RSVP by Wednesday, 18 October 2017 via Outlook or thenortherninstitute@cdu.edu.au

READ MORE ABOUT OUR People. Policy. Place SEMINARS OR SHARE THIS EVENT ON FACEBOOK

 
 
“Herodotus”, the “father of history”

“Herodotus”, the “father of history”


Add to calendar

Presenter:  The Hon. Austin Asche AC QC

Date: Oct 19, 2017

Time: 6:30pm to 9:00pm

Contact person:  Dr George Frazis
T: 89466486
E: george.frazis@cdu.edu.au

Location:  CAS Blue 5.1.01

Target audience:  This event is open to the public. RSVP is required. Please email cahadmin@cdu.edu.au for RSVP.

His great work on the Persian invasion of Greece; and the remarkable victories of the Greeks over the most powerful and dominating nation of the day. The joy of Herodotus is that he spices his history with all sorts of fascinating anecdotes and observations about the countries and the peoples of the world around Greece.

PDF icon formal_invitation-hon.austin_asche_191017.pdf
 
 
 
History Colloquium

History Colloquium


Add to calendar

Presenter:  Various

Date: Oct 21, 2017

Time: 8:30am to 4:30pm

Contact person:  Steven Farram
T: 08 8946 6865
E: steven.farram@cdu.edu.au

Location:  Northern Territory Library, Parliament House, Darwin

Target audience:  This event is open for public. No RSVP required.

The annual Darwin History Colloquium is supported by the Northern Territory Library, the Professional Historians Association (NT), the Centre for Environmental History at The Australian National University, and Charles Darwin University.

The Colloquium is a forum for established and emerging researchers from both the NT and interstate to present papers on their current research.

All are welcome to attend.

PDF icon 2017 History Colloquium Program
 
 
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
 
2017 International Conference for Realist Research, Evaluation and Synthesis: From Promise to Practice

2017 International Conference for Realist Research, Evaluation and Synthesis: From Promise to Practice


Add to calendar

Presenter:  Various realist researchers, evaluators and students

Date: Oct 24, 2017 to Oct 26, 2017

Time: 9:00am to 5:00pm

Contact person:  Expert Events
T: +61 7 3848 2100
E: realist2017@expertevents.com.au

Location:  Brisbane Convention & Exhibition Centre

Target audience:  Those practising or wanting to know more about realist evaluation, realist synthesis and other kinds of realist research. - Those commissioning realist work, or using realist findings. - Service providers and policy officers in both government and non-government sectors. - PhD students and supervisors. - Evaluators and researchers in house, independent, and academic. - Program managers and other staff with responsibilities in evaluation. - People designing new policies and programs.

2017 is the twenty-year anniversary of the seminal text, Realistic Evaluation, by Ray Pawson and Nick Tilley. Twenty years on, we want to ask ‘the realist question’ about realist methods themselves.  In what ways and in what circumstances have realist methods lived up to their promise of being useful for policy and programs – or not – and why? Is this any different to any other form of evaluation or research?

  • Are realist methods as useful in practice as they promised to be?
  • What methods are effective in realist research and evaluation?
  • What are the latest innovations in methods?
  • What needs to change for realist methods to live up to their promise?

These are some of the key questions that will be addressed in the fourth international realist conference, From Promise to Practice, to be held in Brisbane, Australia, from 24-26 October 2017.  

This fourth conference will continue the tradition of realist conferences building a community of practice, sharing and discussing methods for use in realist approaches. This time, we hope to get a strong emphasis on strengthening the Australasian community of practice, as well as our links with the wider international community of practice.  What new methods have been attempted? What has worked well, and not so well, for what, and why? How do Australasian contexts (including Maori, Torres Strait Islander, Australian Aboriginal and other indigenous peoples’ involvement) affect the mechanisms that operate and the outcomes we see here?   

This is the first realist methodology conference to be held outside the UK. It provides a great opportunity for people in Australia, New Zealand and our near neighbours to network with each other, and with leading methodologists and practitioners from around the world.

Please visit the conference website for more information on the conference, registration, call for abstracts and call for workshops.

This event is proudly sponsored by the Northern Institute at Charles Darwin University.

 
 
 
 
 
Introduction to Demography - 1 Day Short Course in Canberra

Introduction to Demography - 1 Day Short Course in Canberra


Add to calendar

Presenter:  Dr. Tom Wilson and Dr. Andrew Taylor

Date: Oct 24, 2017

Time: 10:00am to 4:30pm

Contact person:  Hannah Payer
T: 0403 894 127
E: hannah.payer@cdu.edu.au

Location:  Wilson Conference Room, Ground Floor ABS House, 45 Benjamin Way, Belconnen, Canberra

Target audience:  This course has been designed for analysts, planners, policy officers, managers, and postgraduate students who find a basic knowledge of demography useful to their work. It should also be of value to others with an interest in how and why Australia's population is changing. RSVP is required.

The course provides a gentle introduction to demography - the study of population - with a particular emphasis on understanding Australian demographic change.

No prior knowledge of demography is assumed, and the emphasis is on population trends rather than statistics.

Register your attendance today.

 
“It’s always an adventure”: Parental experiences of disability in the Darwin area

“It’s always an adventure”: Parental experiences of disability in the Darwin area


Add to calendar

Presenter:  Dr. Bea Staley, Lecturer - Special Needs & Inclusive Education, School of Education, Charles Darwin University

Date: Oct 24, 2017

Time: 10:30am to 11:30am

Contact person:  Northern Institute, CDU
T: 08 8946 7468
E: thenortherninstitute@cdu.edu.au

Location:  Northern Institute, Yellow Building 1, Level 2, Room 48 (Savanna Room)

Target audience:  Open to the Public - All Welcome – Please Share

Abstract: Research supports high quality Early Intervention (EI) services for young children with delays and disabilities. While much has been written about the justification for services, and the efficacy of services in regards to patient outcomes, we know much less about how parents and carers interact with EI services and their perception of what constitutes an effective service. With the implementation of the National Disability Insurance Scheme, parents and carers will play a bigger role in advocating for the child and selecting the service from the available providers. Given the changing landscape of disability service provision it is timely to ask parents about their interactions with EI services.

This research was designed to understand parent (and caregiver) experiences of having a child with disabilities in the Darwin area and the supports and limitations to accessing services. This qualitative research (which is ongoing) has involved the 25 Darwin area parents of children (to date) who either had a diagnosis (e.g. Down syndrome, Autism Spectrum Disorder) or were eligible for Early Intervention services in the Darwin area. Parents and caregivers participated in open-ended interviews about their experiences having a child with additional needs, including the diagnostic process and experiences with education and health providers.

Interviews revealed the perceived supports and constraints around access to allied health services and education. This presentation reveals themes that arose across interviews, including parental advice and concerns important for other parents, teachers and clinicians. This research contributes to the literature by supporting a growing understanding of parental perceptions about their child’s services and they ways parents may need additional support.

About Dr. Bea Staley: Dr. Bea Staley is a Lecturer of Special Needs and Inclusive Education at Charles Darwin University. Bea is also a research affiliate with Carpentaria Disability Services’ Early Intervention team (“Carpentaria Kids”) which delivers transdisciplinary allied health services to families of children with special needs. Bea has an interest in narrative inquiry and storytelling and the contributions families can make to improving both education and allied health service delivery for children with additional needs. Read her full profile HERE.

RSVP by Monday, 23 October 2017 via Outlook or thenortherninstitute@cdu.edu.au

READ MORE ABOUT OUR People. Policy. Place SEMINARS OR SHARE THIS EVENT ON FACEBOOK

 
 
Open Access Week Panel Session and Award Presentation

Open Access Week Panel Session and Award Presentation


Add to calendar

Presenter:  Panel of speakers

Date: Oct 24, 2017

Time: 3:00pm to 5:00pm

Contact person:  Jayshree Mamtora
T: 08 8946 6541
E: jayshree.mamtora@cdu.edu.au

Location:  Building Orange 3, Lecture Theatre, Casuarina campus

Target audience:  This event is open to the public. RSVP is essential.

CDU Library cordially invites you to attend the 10th Annual Open Access Week Panel Discussion followed by drinks and nibbles.

This year’s theme, “Open in order to…”

Our panel:

  • Professor Sue Carthew, Provost and Vice President
  • Professor Lindsay Hutley, School of Environment
  • Professor Peter Morris, Menzies School of Health Research
  • Dr. Michaela Spencer, Northern Institute

We will also be presenting the 2017 CDU Library Open Access Award.

Details

Tuesday 24 October 2017, 3pm.

Orange 3 Theatre, Casuarina campus.

All Welcome.

Please RSVP by Friday 20 October 2017.

E. jayshree.mamtora@cdu.edu.au | T. 08 8946 6451

 
Taking Inspiration from Yolngu Knowledge and Culture Practices to Theorize a Concept of Participation – Asking about the Language Practices of Predication and Designation

Taking Inspiration from Yolngu Knowledge and Culture Practices to Theorize a Concept of Participation – Asking about the Language Practices of Predication and Designation


Add to calendar

Presenter:  Professor Helen Verran, Senior Researcher & HDR Network Coordinator, Northern Institute, Charles Darwin University

Date: Oct 25, 2017

Time: 2:30pm to 3:30pm

Contact person:  Northern Institute
T: 08 8946 7468
E: thenortherninstitute@cdu.edu.au

Location:  Northern Institute, Yellow Building 1, Level 2, Room 48 (Savanna Room)

Target audience:  Open to the Public - All Welcome – Please Share

Abstract: The concept of participation and how we might imagine collective participation as ecological, or more precisely, as techno-ecological: that is my focus. My inspiration, as I struggle to think with and through practices in pursuing a relational ethnography, is my past participations in Yolngu Aboriginal Australian knowledge and culture practices. In particular, it is my experience of participating in the development of a radical mathematics curriculum for Yolngu schools in the 1990s that is my inspiration.
Using analogical thinking, this inspiration is mobilized in generating a radically new and different account of the ordinary everyday practices that are common to all languages: the practices of predicating and designating understood as a form of participation. This will involve me in doing some rather arcane philosophy. Before I indulge in that activity (definitely an acquired taste for a social analyst), I explain why I am struggling with this seemingly ridiculous undertaking, when, as every linguist I have ever met asserts, we have a perfectly workable account of designating and predicating already.

About Professor Helen Verran: Professor Helen Verran is a Senior Research Fellow and the HDR Network Coordinator at the Northern Institute, Charles Darwin University. Beginning her career as a natural scientist, her focus shifted towards the philosophy and sociology of science in the early 1980’s. At this time she began to draw on her experiences of teaching maths in Nigeria to elaborate a new philosophy of number able to work with radical differences. From the late 1980s until 2012 she taught history and philosophy of science at University of Melbourne. During that time her research focus involved working with Yolngu Aboriginal Australians in Arnhem Land as they endeavoured to engage their knowledge traditions with environmental science, medical science and social science. This led to interests in policy. In her current Northern Institute work Helen specialises in using ethnographic approaches in researching how situated knowledge can contribute to design of human services products that can be delivered by Indigenous organizations. Helen seeks to imagine policy processes that can lead to better designed and evaluated services products in the Northern Territory. Read her full profile HERE.

RSVP by Tuesday, 24 October 2017 via Outlook or thenortherninstitute@cdu.edu.au

READ MORE ABOUT OUR People. Policy. Place SEMINARS OR SHARE THIS EVENT ON FACEBOOK

 
 
Professorial Lecture: Professor Lindsay Hutley

Professorial Lecture: Professor Lindsay Hutley


Add to calendar

Presenter:  Professor Lindsay Hutley

Date: Oct 25, 2017

Time: 5:30pm to 7:00pm

Contact person:  Robyn McDougall
T: 08 8946 6551
E: robyn.mcdougall@cdu.edu.au

Location:  Charles Darwin Theatre, Casuaurina campus

Target audience:  This event is open to the public. RSVP is required.

Professor Lindsay Hutley presents "From leaves to ecosystems: understanding the impacts and management of global change".

Economic and population growth have rapidly increased since the 1950s, with feedback to the atmosphere, geosphere and biosphere now evident at global, regional and local scales. Ecosystems provide fundamental services such as food, fibre and clean water that sustain human societies, and scientists play a crucial role in providing policy makers and the public with a firm understanding of the global threats to ecosystem viability and how we might achieve more sustainable solutions. Ecosystems consist of interconnecting systems, and an understanding of the mechanistic processes of the basic organisation units (e.g. leaves) to responses of whole ecosystems to environmental change is needed.

This talk will focus on the research programs underway at Charles Darwin University’s Research Institute for the Environment and Livelihoods that aim to understand and predict the effects of these human impacts with a focus on North Australian ecosystems. These themes will be illustrated by describing the ecology, plant physiology and biogeochemicalcycles (e.g. carbon, water, nitrogen) that operate in North Australian ecosystems, in particular the vast savanna ecosystems. How will Northern landscapes change to increased climate variability or land use? Are they resilient and at what stage do we reach “tipping points”, where ecosystems may flip into another state?

Please RSVP to CDUEvents@cdu.edu.au or call 08 8946 6554.

PDF icon Professorial Lecture Series Flyer
 
 
Introduction to Demography - 1 Day Short Course in Sydney

Introduction to Demography - 1 Day Short Course in Sydney


Add to calendar

Presenter:  Dr. Tom Wilson and Dr. Andrew Taylor

Date: Oct 26, 2017

Time: 10:00am to 4:30pm

Contact person:  Hannah Payer
T: 0403 894 127
E: hannah.payer@cdu.edu.au

Location:  CDU Sydney campus, Level 10, 815 George Street, Haymarket, Sydney

Target audience:  This course has been designed for analysts, planners, policy officers, managers, and postgraduate students who find a basic knowledge of demography useful to their work. It should also be of value to others with an interest in how and why Australia's population is changing. RSVP is required.

The course provides a gentle introduction to demography - the study of population - with a particular emphasis on understanding Australian demographic change.

No prior knowledge of demography is assumed, and the emphasis is on population trends rather than statistics.

Register your attendance today.

 
Researching Participation in Regional Futures in Australia and Germany

Researching Participation in Regional Futures in Australia and Germany


Add to calendar

Presenter:  Professor Helen Verran, Dr. Josefine Raasch & Dr. Michaela Spencer

Date: Oct 26, 2017

Time: 2:30pm to 3:30pm

Contact person:  Northern Institute
T: 08 8946 7468
E: thenortherninstitute@cdu.edu.au

Location:  Northern Institute, Yellow Building 1, Level 2, Room 48 (Savanna Room)

Target audience:  Open to the Public - All Welcome – Please Share

Professor Helen Verran, Senior Researcher & HDR Network Coordinator, Northern Institute, Charles Darwin University - Link to online BIO
Dr. Josefine Raasc,
Mercator Research Group, Ruhr-University Bochum, Germany - Link to online BIO
Dr. Michaela Spencer,
Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Northern Institute, Charles Darwin University - Link to online BIO

Abstract: Our focus is challenges faced by Indigenous organisations and refugee organisations as they work with governments. In a comparative research project we ask how engaging such challenges is linked to the making of regional futures. Our research is part of a wider project comparatively researching democratic participation, a project developing through partnerships with German universities. In focusing on Indigenous and refugee or migrant organizations, we want to broaden participation in democratic institutions, and shape futures in our respective regions; to expand the voices in conversations that decide what matters for our shared futures.
This seminar is a contribution to developing a partnership with Ruhr University Bochum (RUB) in Germany. This partnership will involve student exchange between the Northern Institute and the Centre for Anthropological Knowledge in Scientific and Technological Cultures at RUB.

RSVP by Wednesday, 25 October 2017 via Outlook or thenortherninstitute@cdu.edu.au

READ MORE ABOUT OUR People. Policy. Place SEMINARS OR SHARE THIS EVENT ON FACEBOOK

 
30
31
1
2
3
4
5
 
Realist Approaches to Ethnography: A Workshop

Realist Approaches to Ethnography: A Workshop


Add to calendar

Presenter:  Rebecca Hardwick

Date: Oct 31, 2017

Time: 8:30am to 12:30pm

Contact person:  Pawinee Yuhun
T: +61 8 8946 7465
E: pawinee.yuhun@cdu.edu.au

Location:  CDU Casuarina Campus, Building Yellow 1 Level 2 Room 48

Target audience:  Open to all audiences.

Ethnographic approaches to research design, data collection and analysis enable the researcher to gain a ‘lived experience’ of the social phenomena being studied.  Being situated in an area of study can strengthen contextual and temporal understandings. This lends itself very well to a realist approach which aims to understand how context influences the effectiveness of policies, programmes and interventions.

The first part of the workshop is an introduction to realism and ethnographic research that has applied a realist approach.  In the second part of the workshop participants will be invited to go out into the 'real world' to practice their observation skills on CDU campus.  When participants return, they will be shown how to use their observations in a realist way to develop programme theory.

No prior knowledge of ethnography or realism needed.  However, those with ethnographic experience may be interested to see how a realist lens may affect it; and those with realist experience may be interested to see how to apply ethnographic approaches within it.

For more information, please contact R.J.L.Hardwick@exeter.ac.uk

About Becky:

Rebecca Hardwick, PhD student, National Institute for Health Research Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care (PenCLAHRC), University of Exeter Medical School.

Before she worked at the University of Exeter, Becky worked for the UK Department of Health on projects and programmes aimed at implementing health policy in public and non-government service sectors.  Previous projects include the National Dementia Strategy, suicide prevention, and commissioning with non-government organisations.  Prior to the Department of Health, she worked as a regional liaison officer for Mind, a national UK mental health association, on developing and implementing quality standards for Local Mind Associations.  Her roots are in supporting and developing mental health care and policy based on the needs and wishes of people with living experience of mental health problems. 

Becky is currently finishing her PhD at the University of Exeter Medical School.  Her work focusses on research and knowledge use by not-for-profit healthcare organisations and she is using a realist framework to explain these processes.  She has published the findings from her Public Health MSc dissertation1, which was a realist review on the One Stop Shop for women in the criminal justice system as well as the findings from a realist economic review of shared care in a special edition of Evaluation2

She has taught realist review methods and ethnographic methods on the MSc in Health Services Research at the University of Exeter, and has been an invited speaker on realist methods and her research at national and international conferences. 

1 Hardwick, R. (2013) Integrated Services for Women through a One Stop Shop: a realist review. International Journal of Integrated Care, 21(5), 263-275. http://www.emeraldinsight.com/doi/abs/10.1108/JICA-06-2013-0016

2 Anderson, R. Hardwick, R. (2016) Realism and Resources: Towards more explanatory economic evaluation. Evaluation, 22(3), 323-341. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4948109/

FOR MORE INFORMATION AND TO REGISTER PLEASE GO TO:

http://www.cdu.edu.au/northern-institute/events/realist-approaches-ethnography-workshop

 
 
 
 
 
 

Directions

Parking around venues is often limited and we recommend that you arrive early. While every effort is made to ensure vehicle accessibility, there is limited disabled parking near some lecture venues.

Please go to campuses and centres for maps of our campuses.