CDU events

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Why Our Languages Matter - an event to celebrate NAIDOC week

Why Our Languages Matter - an event to celebrate NAIDOC week


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Presenter:  Dr Waymamba Gaykamanu & Northern Institute Researchers

Date: Jul 05, 2017

Time: 2:30pm to 4:00pm

Contact person:  Northern Institute
T: 8946 7468
E: thenortherninstitute@cdu.edu.au

Location:  Northern Institute, Yellow building 1, Level 2, Room 48

NAIDOC week in 2017 celebrates the importance, resilience and richness of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander languages. The Northern Territory has a rich landscape of Indigenous languages, which play key roles in the lives of individuals and communities, in the transmission of knowledge, history, spirituality and law, and as markers of identity.

Join us to hear Indigenous language authorities share about why Indigenous languages matter in the 21st century. This will include:

  • a special presentation by Dr Waymamba Gaykamaŋu (pictured right), a senior Gupapuyŋu woman and Educator. 
  • Learn a few words of a living language from the Top End.
  • Experience some of the interesting work happening on language development by Northern Institute researchers.

To find out more and to register to attend visit https://www.cdu.edu.au/northern-institute/NAIDOC2017-Why-our-languages-matter

Afternoon tea provide

 
 
NAIDOC Night at the Movies

NAIDOC Night at the Movies


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Presenter:  NT Stolen Generations Aboriginal Corporation

Date: Jul 05, 2017

Time: 5:30pm to 9:00pm

Contact person:  Melissa Royle
T: 08 8946 6773
E: melissa.royal@cdu.edu.au

Location:  Mal Nairn Auditorium, Building Red 7, CDU Casuarina

Target audience:  This event is open to the public. No RSVP required.

As part of this year's NAIDOC celebrations, NT Stolen Generations Aboriginal Corporation presents - 'NAIDOC Night at the Movies'.

Showing: 'Down Memory Lane', produced by Don Christopherson, followed by 'Lion', with light refreshments at the conclusion.

Proudly sponsored by Office of Pro Vice-Chancellor Indigenous Leadership, CDU.

 
 
Helping others kick goals

Helping others kick goals


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Presenter:  Alan Tounge

Date: Jul 06, 2017

Time: 10:00am to 11:00am

Contact person:  Kimberly Beebe
T: 0415 507 337
E: events@adcnt.org.au

Location:  Building Orange 3, Lecture Theatre

Target audience:  This event is open to the public. No RSVP required.

Australia Day Council NT proudly presents ACT Australian of the Year, Alan Tongue, during his Tour of Honour in the Northern Territory.

Alan will talk about his life after retiring from a stellar sporting career in 2011, and how he decided to dedicate his talents to help young people in the youth justice system make the most of the cards they'd been dealt. Alan created an 'Aspire Program' to rehabilitate young people and equip them with life skills to make positive choices. The program has since expanded to include other disengaged youth in Canberra's schools.

In addition to his work with the Aspire Program, Alan is also determined to tackle family violence, and travels throughout the ACT and NSW to educate football players and high school students about how they can eradicate family violence while partnering with Barnardos to teach young people how to build healthy and respectful relationships.

Alan Tounge is a former Canberra Raiders captain and representative rugby league player. Read more about Alan on his Australian of the Year Profile.

 
 
Book Launch: History of Bilingual Education in the Northern Territory

Book Launch: History of Bilingual Education in the Northern Territory


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Presenter:  Professor Tom Calma AO

Date: Jul 06, 2017

Time: 10:00am to 11:00am

Contact person:  Kate Elder
T: 08 8946 6187
E: kate.elder@cdu.edu.au

Location:  CDU Libruary, Building Red 8, Level 2 Balcony

Target audience:  This event is open to the public with RSVP essential. Please RSVP to Shanika at pubudu.gunawardena@cdu.edu.au by 12 noon Wednesday 5 July.

NAIDOC week in 2017 celebrates the importance, resilience and richness of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander languages.

Join Professor Tom Calma AO, Chancellor of the University of Canberra, Australian Aboriginal elder of the Kungarakan people, and human rights and social justice campaigner, to launch this important new publication.

History of Bilingual Education in the Northern Territory: People, Programs and Policies edited by Brian Devlin, Samantha Disbray and Nancy Devlin.

This book provides the first detailed history of the Bilingual Education Program in the Northern Territory. This ambitious and innovative program began in 1973 and, at different time, operated in English and 19 Aboriginal languages in 29 very remote schools. The book draws together the grassroots perspectives of Indigenous and non-Indigenous practioners and researchers. Each chapter is based on rich practitioner experience; capturing bottom up aspirations, achievements and reflections on this innovative, yet largely undocumented language and education program. 

"a remarkable book" - Professor Jim Cummins

Morning tea will be provided. Please RSVP to Shanika at pubudu.gunawardena@cdu.edu.au by 12 noon on Wednesday 5 July.

 
Investigating the role of digital language resources in the ecology of Australian Indigenous Languages

Investigating the role of digital language resources in the ecology of Australian Indigenous Languages


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Presenter:  Cathy Bow, Research Associate & PhD Candidate, Northern Institute, CDU

Date: Jul 06, 2017

Time: 1:00pm to 2:00pm

Contact person:  Northern Institute
T: 08 8946 7468
E: thenortherninstitute@cdu.edu.au

Location:  Northern Institute, Yellow Building 1, Level 2, Room 48 (Savanna Room)

Target audience:  Open To The Public - All Welcome – Please Share

In this research Cathy aims to investigate the role of digital language resources in the ecology of Australian Indigenous languages, with a focus on two resources in which she has been involved in developing. The Living Archive of Aboriginal Languages is a digital collection of endangered literature in Indigenous languages of the Northern Territory, and the Digital Language Shell project is an online learning management system designed to enable Indigenous authorities to teach their language and culture to interested learners using digital tools.

This research will explore the use and usefulness of these resources as they come to life in pedagogical and other contexts. The evaluation of these resources will identify some of the implicit assumptions of the different users about language and technologies, and how these can work more productively together.

About Cathy Bow
Cathy Bow is a linguist with research experience in both descriptive and applied linguistics. She has described the sound system of an African language, investigated language development in children with impaired hearing, explored endangered language documentation, and researched the language and communication needs of international medical graduates.

Cathy has worked as a teacher of English as an Additional Language, and as a trainer and coach for language learners. She currently works as project manager for the Living Archive of Aboriginal Languages, and is currently completing her PhD in digital technologies and Aboriginal languages.

RSVP by Wednesday 05 July 2017 via Outlook or thenortherninstitute@cdu.edu.au

READ MORE ABOUT OUR People. Policy. Place SEMINARS OR SHARE THIS EVENT ON FACEBOOK

 
 
 
 
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Indigenous languages are good for your health

Indigenous languages are good for your health


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Presenter:  Dr Michael Walsh, Senior Research Fellow, AIATSIS Centre for Australian LanguagesIndigenous Social and Cultural Wellbeing (ISCW); Honorary Associate, University of Sydney; Honorary Associate, University of Sydney; Research Affiliate, CoEDL

Date: Jul 11, 2017

Time: 10:30am to 11:30am

Contact person:  Northern Institute, Charles Darwin University
T: 08 8946 7468
E: thenortherninstitute@cdu.edu.au

Location:  Northern Institute, Yellow Building 1, Level 2, Room 48 (Savanna Room)

Target audience:  Open To The Public - All Welcome – Please Share

Abstract
Particularly over the last 25 years a good deal of attention has been paid to the retention and revitalization of Indigenous languages. For me the best read of 2009 was chapter 3 of the Social Justice Report: The perilous state of Indigenous languages in Australia (Calma 2009). Amongst other things the question, why preserve Indigenous languages?, is addressed. One part of the answer is improved health: "While Australia lacks research on culture and resilience, we do have longitudinal research data which demonstrates a correlation between strong language and culture in Indigenous homeland communities and positive health outcomes. A ten year study of Indigenous Australians in Central Australia found that 'connectedness to culture, family and land, and opportunities for self-determination' assist in significantly lower morbidity and mortality rates in Homeland residents". I had been aware for some time that the retention and revitalization of Indigenous languages could be beneficial to mental and societal health but was somewhat taken aback by the effects on physical health including reduced risk of diabetes and cardiovascular disease (see also Whalen et al. 2016). Language is postulated as core to a people's wellbeing and mental health. Hallett, Chandler and Lalonde (2007) report a clear correlation between youth suicide and lack of conversational knowledge in the native language in British Columbia, Canada. In this paper it will also be demonstrated that learning an Indigenous language can lead to a substantial downturn in racism. For this and other reasons, Indigenous languages are good for your health.

About Dr Michael Walsh
Since 1972 Dr Michael Walsh has conducted fieldwork in the Top End of the Northern Territory, mainly in the Darwin-Daly region. This has been a mixture of academic endeavours as well as consultancies since 1979 mainly relating to Aboriginal land issues. From 1999 he has participated in the revitalization of Aboriginal languages in NSW. From 1982 until 2005 he was part of the teaching staff of the Department of Linguistics, University of Sydney.
Publications: 10 books/monographs/compilations authored, co-authored, edited or co-edited. more than 70 articles or book chapters, 45 reports to governments or for consultancies, including co-author of the NSW Aboriginal Languages K-10 Syllabus (2003) and co-author of the national Framework for [the teaching of] Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Languages (2015). Read Dr. Michael Walsh’s profile HERE.  

RSVP by Monday 10 July 2017 via Outlook or thenortherninstitute@cdu.edu.au

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Book Launch: An Introduction to Wildlife Conservation in the Brazilian Amazon: A View from Northern Australia

Book Launch: An Introduction to Wildlife Conservation in the Brazilian Amazon: A View from Northern Australia


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Presenter:  Dr Carla Eisemberg

Date: Jul 17, 2017

Time: 4:30pm to 6:30pm

Contact person:  Vanya Bosiocic
T: 08 8946 7381
E: vanya.bosiocic@cdu.edu.au

Location:  Mal Nairn Auditorium, Charles Darwin University Casuarina

Target audience:  This event is open to the public. RSVP is required.

Celebrate wildlife conservation in the Amazon!

The Amazon is one of the most biologically diverse regions in the world. Understanding its ecological processes is the key to its protection, now and into the future.

Come and celebrate the success of Charles Darwin University researchers and students, while supporting the amazon conservation efforts of local communities in Brazil.

Please RSVP by registering your attendance.

 
Sustainable Development and Legal Identity: Promises of Inclusion and Dangers of Exclusion

Sustainable Development and Legal Identity: Promises of Inclusion and Dangers of Exclusion


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Presenter:  Christoph Sperfeldt

Date: Jul 18, 2017

Time: 10:30am to 11:30am

Contact person:  Northern Institute
T: 8946 7468
E: thenortherninstitute@cdu.edu.au

Location:  Northern Institute, Yellow Building 1, Level 2, Room 48 (Savanna Room)

Abstract
Statelessness and other forms of legal identity problems are a global phenomenon that affects millions of people worldwide. Those who find themselves without a recognised legal identity face daily obstacles resulting from a lack of access to a range of social, political and economic rights and opportunities; all with significant adverse impact on their living conditions. When adopting the sustainable development goals (SDGs) in 2015, the UN General Assembly acknowledged that means to proving legal identity are linked to development outcomes.
The SDGs now aspire, under goal 16.9, ‘by 2030 [to] provide legal identity for all including birth registration’. By making the invisible legally visible, the SDGs promise to promote more inclusive development. However, requiring legal identity to enable access to rights and services could have the unintended effect of further excluding some of the most marginalised populations who face serious barriers in obtaining legal identity. Building upon field research among minority groups in Cambodia, this presentation highlights the significance of SDG 16.9 for inclusive development, but also the risks associated with linking development to legal identification. At stake is not just a technocratic exercise of registering populations, but a highly contentious process of tackling identity politics and transforming deeply entrenched social realities.

About Christoph Sperfeldt
Christoph Sperfeldt is a PhD scholar at the School of Regulation and Global Governance (RegNet), Australian National University, and a University Fellow at Charles Darwin University. Mr Sperfeldt has also worked as Deputy Director at the Asian International Justice Initiative, a joint program of the East-West Center and the Handa Center for Human Rights and International Justice at Stanford University. In this capacity, he has supported human rights and justice sector research and capacity-building efforts in Southeast Asia. Prior to this, Mr Sperfeldt was Senior Advisor with the Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) in Cambodia. Read Christoph Sperfeldt’s profile HERE

RSVP by Monday, 17 July 2017  via Outlook or thenortherninstitute@cdu.edu.au

 
 
'Contested Indian Ocean Regionalisms: The Rise and Return of the Indo-Pacific’

'Contested Indian Ocean Regionalisms: The Rise and Return of the Indo-Pacific’


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Presenter:  Professor Timothy Doyle

Date: Jul 20, 2017

Time: 2:30pm to 3:30pm

Contact person:  Northern Institute
T: 08 8946 7468
E: thenortherninstitute@cdu.edu.au

Location:  Northern Institute, Yellow Building 1, Level 2, Room 48 (Savanna Room)

Target audience:  Open To the Public - All Welcome

Professor Timothy Doyle
Professor of Politics and International Studies, University of Adelaide, Australia
Professor and Distinguished Research Fellow of Indian Ocean Futures, Curtin University, Australia
Emeritus Professor of Politics and International Relations, Keele University, United Kingdom
Chief Editor, Journal of the Indian Ocean Region (Routledge, London)

Abstract
Dictated and driven to a significant extent by the changing dynamics of knowledge-power equations, regional constructions are devised and propagated for a range of purposes - describing economic success, structuring a set of relationships, reproducing a particular vision of (in) security, or organising a specific function, such as to maximise economic cooperation, to minimise insecurity or to fashion a particular form of security architecture. It is argued that there are three competing regional constructions for security (currently in circulation) in the Indian Ocean Region: an Indian Ocean-wide concept, an East Indian Ocean construct and an Indo-Pacific concept. Depending on which construction is selected and adhered to, the place of Australia in the ‘new’ geopolitics and geoeconomics of the current world order is similarly hotly contested. In this paper’s conclusions, it is suggested that there exists an overriding narrative in favour of an ‘Indo-Pacific’ construction at the expense of certain Indian Ocean concepts.
This research is part of a much larger project entitled ‘Building an Indian Ocean Region’ DP 120101066, which is funded by the Australian Research Council (ARC) Discovery Projects Scheme 2012 – 2017.

About Professor Timothy Doyle
Professor Timothy Doyle, Adelaide, Curtin and Keele Universities, has taught and contributed to university courses in the United Kingdom, the United States, Malaysia, India and Australia. He is Vice-Chair of the Indian Ocean Research Group (IORG) based in Chandigarh and Perth, which has official Observer status in IORA. He is founding Chair the Indo-Pacific Governance Research Centre (IPGRC) based at University of Adelaide; and he served as founding Head of the Research Centre for Politics, International Relations and Environment (RC4SPIRE) at Keele University in the UK. Currently, he is Immediate-Past-Chair of the Indian Ocean Rim Academic Group (IORAG) based in Ebene, Mauritius, and has been appointed as a Distinguished Research Fellow in the Australia-Asia-Pacific Institute (AAPI) at Curtin University. Currently he also serves as the Department and Foreign Affairs and Trade (DFAT) Focal Point for the Indian Ocean Rim. He is Editor-in-Chief of the new international Journal of the Indian Ocean Region (Routledge: London and New Delhi); and serves on the editorial boards of the international journals Social Movement Studies (Routledge: London); and Global Faultlines (Pluto Press, London). He is series editor of Environment and Society titles in the Routledge Introductions to Environment Series. He is series editor, with Phil Catney, of the Transforming Environmental Politics and Policy series, Routledge, London. He has been a dedicated environmental and human rights activist since the 1980s, publishing over a dozen books in the areas of Indian Ocean Studies, global political economy, politics and international relations of the environment, social and political movements, and political fiction. Read Timothy Doyle’s profile HERE

RSVP by Wednesday 19 July 2017 via Outlook or thenortherninstitute@cdu.edu.au

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Art Forum: Nano-Immateriality in Art

Art Forum: Nano-Immateriality in Art


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Presenter:  Dr Ioannis Michaloudis

Date: Jul 27, 2017

Time: 12:00pm to 1:00pm

Contact person:  Mats Unden
T: 08 8946 7353
E: mats.unden@cdu.edu.au

Location:  Building Blue 2A, Casuaria campus

Target audience:  This event is open to the public. No RSVP is required.

Dr Ioannis Michaloudis is an academic, visual artist and researcher unternationally acknowledged as one of the leaders in Art & Science and the first ever creator and investigtor on the application of NASA's nanomaterial silica aerogel in Vidual Arts. During this lecture he will present the evolution of his research with a focus on the topic he will present to the Art & Science Symposium School of Creative Arts and Humanities, beginning August 2017.

 
 
 
 
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Parking around venues is often limited and we recommend that you arrive early. While every effort is made to ensure vehicle accessibility, there is limited disabled parking near some lecture venues.

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