Consent Matters: a free online course

Sexual health and consent

Sexual health is something we should all think about.  Being sexually healthy is about having the information and support you need to explore sexuality and relationships in a healthy, respectful and safe way.

CDU has a diverse student community with people coming from a range of backgrounds and cultures. Everyone may have had very different experiences thinking and talking about sexuality. Although sexual health might not be something you’re familiar with discussing, it’s important to know how to stay sexually healthy and safe whether you’re in a relationship or not.

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What is sexual consent?

Consent, in this context, means freely and voluntarily agreeing to intimate and sexual activity.  Not everyone feels comfortable being direct, assertive or explicit.  We all have different boundaries and levels of comfort when talking about sex. So it is important that we can talk openly.  Asking to stop or try something else is the right thing to do if you are not comfortable.

Consent also means taking responsibility for and ensuring the other person is comfortable and agrees to engage in sexual activity with you.  Understanding consent and acceptable behaviour is essential before you engage in any sexual encounter.  Respect for one another’s personal boundaries and wellbeing is at the heart of sexual consent.  Consent is verbal and physical and is given when someone says ‘yes’ to sexual activity.

The best way to make sure of having sexual consent is to ask.  Sexual consent cannot be given by someone who is under the age of 16, forced or coerced, intoxicated, affected by drugs, asleep, unconscious, incapable of saying no or unable to understand what they are consenting to.  Engaging with a person in any of these states is sexual assault. Sexual consent can be withdrawn at any time during a sexual encounter: people can change their minds –even right before or during sex.  Consent is an ongoing conversation, and we all have the right to say stop.

Consent Matters - the course

Consent Matters is a free, online interactive and evidence-based course that uses activities, quizzes and relatable character scenarios and explores and the nature of sexual consent, how to identify when it has been given and where it cannot be given.  This course teaches the importance of good communication, clear boundaries, and mutual respect.   

This course is for all adults.

The aim of the course is to provide students with the information and education to recognise difficult situations and possible ways of stepping in if you see or hear something that makes you uncomfortable or others need help.  It is about promoting positive change and ensuring that the university community is a safe and supportive environment for all. 

The module takes one hour to complete; however, it does not have to be completed all at once.  You can log in again and pick up where you left off. 

If you are affected by any of the topics discussed in the module or know someone who needs help at any time, please see below for free and confidential services available. 

How to access the course

Steps to follow to access the course:

  1. Go to: https://studying.epigeum.com
  2. Click on ‘How it Works’ on the top tab, then Register Now and complete the form registering with your @cdu.edu.au email address. (If you’re having trouble finding your notification email, check your junk mail.). You will then receive an activation link to your email which you need to activate your account.
  3. Once registration is complete, users can log in to Consent Matters – Australian Version from the list of online courses available.
  4. Click on the course to begin.

Support

If you are having sex it is important to know the facts about sexually transmissible infections (STIs) contraception and how to stay safe.

Your general practitioner (GP/doctor)  will be able to help you or find a sexual health service in your area.

Charles Darwin University offers confidential and non-judgemental advice through the counselling service in Equity Services. For further information or to book an appointment online: counselling@cdu.edu.au or phone 8946 6288.

For CDU Out-of-Hours Telephone Crisis Support T. 1300 933 393 is also available.

Service Required

Service

Telephone Number

Email Address  
Web Address

NATIONAL

Emergency

Police/Ambulance/Fire

000

 

Counselling & Support

CDU Counselling Service

08 8946 6288

counselling@cdu.edu.au

 

CDU After Hours Crisis Line

1300 933 393

 

 

National Sexual Assault, Domestic Family Violence Counselling Service

1800 737 732

1800respect.org.au

 

Lifeline

13 11 14

 

 

Universities Australia National Support Line

1800 572 224

 

 

EASA - Counselling & Support for CDU Staff

08 8941 1752

easadarwin@easa.org.au

Complaint

CDU Complaints Management Unit

08 8946 6509

complaints@cdu.edu.au

www.cdu.edu.au/strategicservices-governance/complaints

NORTHERN TERRITORY

Emergency

Police/Ambulance/Fire

000

 

Campus Security

CDU Security

08 8946 7777
1800 646 501

 

Counselling & Support

CDU Counselling Service

08 8946 6288

counselling@cdu.edu.au

 

CDU After Hours Crisis Line

1300 933 393

 

 

Ruby Gaea Darwin Centre Against Sexual Violence

08 8945 0155

www.rubygaea.net.au

 

Sexual Assault Referral Centre (SARC)

08 8922 6472

www.nt.gov.au/wellbeing/hospitals-health-services/sexual-assault-referral-centres

 

Darwin Community Legal Service

08 8982 1111

dcls.org.au

Complaint

CDU Complaints Management Unit

08 8946 6509

complaints@cdu.edu.au

www.cdu.edu.au/strategicservices-governance/complaints